News — Military

Where Did the Number "22" Come From?

Where Did the Number "22" Come From?

  It seems that everywhere you turn, charities and organizations that are formed to help combat veteran suicide use some derivative of the same statistic in their name or mission/vision statements. At IFHP, we use it in our ENDING 22 Collection: “22 US Armed Forces veterans commit suicide each day.” But where did this “22 statistic" come from and what is the true meaning behind it? Instead of the typically-used byline, “the VA states that…”, we decided it was long past-due to bring you the actual source of the information.   Where does the 22 statistic come from? The often-heard...

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Taylor Michel
10% of the Profits From Our ENDING 22 Collection Have a Specific Target

10% of the Profits From Our ENDING 22 Collection Have a Specific Target

  Yesterday, we posted our official announcement that we will donate 10% of the profits associated with our ENDING 22 Collection to Mission 22, but we didn’t really go into much detail to define the “why” of our decision. This was intentional, as we wanted to dedicate a full blog post to this information. We feel this decision truly deserves a bit more recognition.   Who is Mission 22? Mission 22 is a nonprofit organization that was created with the intent to help heal America’s veterans. With the tagline, “When their tour is over, our mission begins,” Mission 22 supports the...

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Senators Seek to end Undue Discrimination Against Military Dependents who Seek Mental Health Treatment (militarytimes.com)

Senators Seek to end Undue Discrimination Against Military Dependents who Seek Mental Health Treatment (militarytimes.com)

  When dependent children of military members join the armed services themselves, their dependent medical records are being merged into their servicemember record, which is created as soon as they enter boot camp. This creates a problem for any individual who has been treated for mental health conditions as a child, because the military doesn't generally accept anyone with a history of mental illness, regardless of severity or cause. Even the simple act of speaking to a counselor after a move or parent's deployment can be enough to disqualify a person from service. The DoD has encouraged military families to...

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