News — Discrimination

Mental Health no Longer a Disqualifying Factor to Becoming a Lawyer in New Hampshire

Mental Health no Longer a Disqualifying Factor to Becoming a Lawyer in New Hampshire

  The New Hampshire Supreme Court and the Board of Bar Examiners have removed questions about mental health history, diagnosis and treatment from the New Hampshire bar admission application, which is the application a lawyer must submit to be granted license to practice law in the state. In a press release, the New Hampshire Supreme Court Committee on Character and Fitness says it "was persuaded that the questions discouraged law students and others from seeking necessary treatment for mental health and substance abuse problems." "We believe removing these questions will encourage law students and attorneys to stay healthy and seek...

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Black Mental Health Matters, Volume 1

Black Mental Health Matters, Volume 1

  The mental health of black people in America is challenged every day. Viral videos of black men being killed, stories about black people being harassed and having the police called on them while they're just going about their lives, suspicious looks when a black person drives through "the wrong neighborhood," and so many more systemic problems do constant harm to the mental well-being of all African Americans. Preston Mitchum, a civil rights advocate and professor at Georgetown Law Center, highlights the physical symptoms that can accompany the mental anguish of watching another black man killed on camera. Stomach pain, racing...

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Senators Seek to end Undue Discrimination Against Military Dependents who Seek Mental Health Treatment (militarytimes.com)

Senators Seek to end Undue Discrimination Against Military Dependents who Seek Mental Health Treatment (militarytimes.com)

  When dependent children of military members join the armed services themselves, their dependent medical records are being merged into their servicemember record, which is created as soon as they enter boot camp. This creates a problem for any individual who has been treated for mental health conditions as a child, because the military doesn't generally accept anyone with a history of mental illness, regardless of severity or cause. Even the simple act of speaking to a counselor after a move or parent's deployment can be enough to disqualify a person from service. The DoD has encouraged military families to...

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